Wednesday, September 20, 2006

The Devil in the flesh?

Throughout the media, we are repeatedly hearing the term "the Devil" today, as President Hugo Chavez speaks about President Bush. It is not like the comment was unexpected to come out at one point in time especially from the President of Columbia who has already proclaimed his dislike for President Bush, but what is interesting is the rise of supporters of both sides.
President Bush had almost conceived his own policy years ago, "You are either with us or against us." I have spent over an hour reading blogs that were either in full support of President Bush attacking President Chavez with out reading what he claims. In the other side, there are the blogs who cheer on the term Devil applied to President Bush. Certainly I can say harsh things between both sides, but show me someone who you can't chastise?
I don't support President Chavez' claim that President Bush is "the Devil", but I do not view President as any type of saviour; he is human after all.

The point I want to come across is that we are all stubborn in a form or another, but we have to open ourselves at some point, unless we have the proof as to oppose it. i.e. socialism, interventionalist economic policies(including a foreign government intervening with another's policies) On a good note, FED leaves the interest rate alone, oh, and the rise of U.S. and China 'economic dialogue'.

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

I wouldn't have called Bush the devil since I'm not religious, but Chavez is on the right track. There's so much crap going on behind the scenes, furthering the world-dominating agenda of Bushco. Chavez pointed it out, and it must have taken great courage to do so, but I'm sure the other countries already knew about it. Most, unfortunately, have decided that being America's enemy is worse than being America's friend even though America is trying to dominate them.

Most countries are bending over, preparing to take it up the ass, so to speak, so they don't get killed.

I hope you liked my metaphor.

Anonymous said...

http://www.amazon.com/-Partys-Over-Oil-War-Fate-Industrial-Societies/dp/0865715297/sr=1-1/qid=1158789635/ref=sr_1_1/102-4808165-4396947?ie=UTF8&s=books

Here's another book I found. Haven't read this one yet, but I'd like to.

Idunois said...

Anon 4:18
We know of at least two countries that aren't bending over... it was an interesting metaphor.

Anon 6:10 This book seems more interesting than the last, or perhaps you just got me more interesting into the subject. Thanks again.

Anonymous said...

Many countries aren't bending over, but many are.

Anonymous said...

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=viewArticle&code=CHA20060921&articleId=3301

Here's a copy of Chavez's speech. Think about what has been reported over here versus the full context of what he said. Our media is a complete crap factory.

Idunois said...

Anon 2:44
His speech is an interesting speech with some major points, but what he did wrong was call President Bush the "Devil". After his time spent on the podium, the public will only hear the "Devil". It is sad that it became the whole of his speech, but he wanted to begin his speech with a punch; it will be all that it will be remembered for. As a President of a nation, Chavez should have not came across so comical. I actually laughed at his statement upon the smell of sulphur, and in a year, I will remember the speech for that same thing. The Speech that called President Bush the "Devil"

But thanks for including the speech in your link. I don't try to speak poorly about anyone so I was not going to take either side rather would like to end the two sides of the spectrum. For that reason, I did not say anything that was included in the speech rather than the Devil statement. President Chavez needs to develop some class when speaking to the world, instead of making a statement which ruined his whole speech. In a way, it is the joke of the week.

Anonymous said...

Well, Chavez is one of the only world leaders not willing to bend over and take it up the ass, alluding the the metaphor used earlier. I give him alot of respect for that, namecalling or no namecalling.

Idunois said...

I agree Anon 12:26 although I give more respect to the President of Iran President Ahmadinejad for his stature as not to critize leaders of other nations to the point that Chavez has.